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CONTENTS


Troop Philosophy

Troop Meetings

Communications with Parents

Planning

Scout Leadership

Uniforms

Finances

Dues

Scout Accounts

Major Fund Raiser

Other Fund Raisers

Advancement

Campouts

Summer Camp

Venture Crew

Medical & Health Conditions

Medications

Adult Leadeship

Troop Committee

Conduct & Discipline

Rules

Scout Account Policy

 


Troop Philosophy

Troop 268 believes in the philosophy that scouting is for boys to learn, grow and have fun. A primary purpose of scouting is to help boys become leaders. We feel there is no better way to accomplish this than for the boys to take an active role in leading the troop. The phrase, "Boy Led Troop" is indicative of this philosophy, and describes the scouting program offered by Troop 268.


Troop Meetings

Troop 268 meets weekly on Monday nights at 7:00 PM at Worthington Presbyterian Church in the basement (North Entrance). Troop meetings are held throughout the summer, but not during winter or spring breaks, nor on holiday Mondays. The Boy Scout Senior Patrol Leader (SPL)  leads the meeting. He expects to start on time, and to conclude the meetings by 8:30.


Scouts are expected to attend meetings whenever possible. Participation in sports and other school activities may require a scout to miss one or more meetings. The troop encourages participation in other activities like sports and music so a scout will have a better understanding of his interests. However, we also want him to stay in touch and even stop in at meetings for a few minutes. A scout in this situation should contact his patrol leader to stay informed of troop and patrol activities. And of course, a scout's school work should always take higher priority. Scouts are expected to always bring their Boy Scout Handbook, paper, and pencil or pen.


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Communication with Parents

Scouts receive information and handouts during the weekly meetings. These are intended to keep the scouts and parents informed of troop activities and plans. Some announcements made at the meeting may not be accompanied by written information. Please ask your scout about the events of the meetings, and ask him about any announcements which may have been made.

The troop newsletter, produced and distributed approximately monthly, is also used to communicate troop news and plans. A calendar of events is also updated and distributed after each Patrol Leaders' Conference (PLC). Families should update their calendars upon receipt of the troop calendar.


Planning

The key to a successful troop and successful activities is planning. The Patrol Leader's Conference, or PLC is held several times per year to plan and schedule troop activities. The process begins with troop leadership, Patrol Leaders, adult leaders and other interested scouts providing ideas for future activities. All ideas are recorded prior to the PLC meeting, and scouts or patrols may volunteer to plan details of the activities.


At the PLC meeting, the troop's scout and adult leaders discuss the options and determine dates/responsibilities for troop activities during the next several months. Each patrol is represented by their Patrol Leader, who communicated details of the ideas proposed by their patrol. The meeting results in plans for all troop activities including meetings, campouts, hikes, service projects, and Courts of Honor. PLCs may be held on a day other than a regular troop meeting day.


Scout Leadership

A key objective of scouting is to develop leadership skills. Scout troops promote this through a system known as the patrol method. The troop is organized into groups of 5 to 10 boys, called patrols. Under supervision of the Scoutmaster, each patrol elects a Patrol Leader who serves in this capacity for several months. The Patrol Leader selects another scout to serve as an Assistant Patrol Leader. Patrols are responsible for completing campout planning, and other program plans. Newly formed patrols select a patrol name, such as Cobras, Scorpions, Dragons, Eagles, etc. They are also expected to create a patrol flag and a patrol cheer or song.


Numerous other Scout leadership positions are available in the troop. These include Scribe, Quartermaster, Chaplain's Aid, Troop Guide, Photographer, Treasurer, Game Master, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Historian,  and others. To fulfill the troop service requirements of higher ranks, scouts typically serve in troop leadership positions after they achieve the rank of First Class.

The Troop's Youth Leaders

The troop is actually run by its boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, they plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers.

Junior Leader Positions
  • Senior patrol leader - top junior leader in the troop. He leads the patrol leaders' council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.
  • Assistant senior patrol leader - fills in for senior patrol leader in his absence. He is also responsible for training and giving direction to the quartermaster, scribe, troop historian, librarian, and instructors.
  • Troop Historian - collects and maintains troop memorabilia and information on former troop members.
  • Librarian - keeps troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor list available for use by troop members.
  • Instructor - teaches one or more advancement skills to troop members.
  • Chaplain Aide - assists in troop religious services and promotes religious emblems program.
  • Junior assistant Scoutmaster - a Scout 16 or older who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned.
  • Patrol leader - gives leadership to members of his patrol and represents them on the patrol leaders' council.
  • Assistant patrol leader - fills in for the patrol leader in his absence.
  • Venture crew chief - leader of a troop's Venture crew.
  • Varsity team captain - leader of a troop's Varsity team.
  • Troop guide - advisor and guide to the new Scout patrol.
  • Den chief - works with a Cub Scout den as a guide.
  • Quartermaster - responsible for troop supplies and equipment.
  • Scribe - the troop secretary.

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Uniforms

Sports and other extra-curricular activities require certain apparel and equipment. In football it includes a uniform, padding, a helmet, and cleats. For marching band it may include a uniform, hat and shoes. To be a part of the team, you must have the complete uniform and equipment. Scouting is no different.


The Boy Scout Uniform is an important part of scouting, representing equality and providing a sense of belonging. The placement of advancement emblems on the uniform gives the scout a way to show his accomplishments with pride.


The basic scout uniform is known as the Class A uniform. It consists of the scout shirt (short or long sleeved), worn with a pair of scout pants or shorts. When scout shorts are worn, scout socks should also be worn. As an alternative, Scout green or khaki color pants/shorts are acceptable. Scout pants/shorts and belt are strongly encouraged and sometimes required for district and council activities. A scout hat is optional. Jams or other print/multicolored pants or shorts are not permitted. Adult leaders set an example for the scouts, and are expected to wear a uniform meeting the above stated requirements.


Emblems and insignia are best sewn on the shirt. This permits washing, without the risk of an emblem coming off the shirt. Uniform items and their costs as of August, 2007, are shown below.


Required Uniform Items Cost   Preferred Uniform Items Cost
      Switchbacks (slacks that can be shorts)
$39.95
Scout shirt, class A, short sleeve (different materials cost different amounts)
$32.99 to $49.99   Scout slacks (different materials cost different amounts) $44.99 to $54.99
Uniform Patches
Simon Kenton Council patch

$3.00
  Scout shorts (different materials cost different amounts) $39.99 to $54.99
Numerals 2,6,8 $2.67   Scout socks, per pair $4.49
Patrol patch $2.00 to $3.00
  Boy Scout Web belt $8.65
World Scout Crest $1.49  

      Optional Uniform Items Cost
Shoulder loops, 1 pair, red $1.99   Scout hat, mesh cap
$11.99

TOTAL COST, REQUIRED ITEMS:

$44.19 + tax

     

Should the cost of the uniform be a hardship, please let the Scoutmaster know. The troop can make arrangements in special cases to provide help in obtaining the uniform. Second-hand items are also available. Note that a shirt will last many years, so that a large shirt on an 11-year-old scout may well last him until he is 15 or older!


Troop 268 does not require a specific hat or a neckerchief. However, a good hat is essential for summer (for sun protection) and for warmth in winter.


Patches, shirts and other scouting accessories are available at the Scout Shop and by mail order from the Scout Catalog.


Directions for placement of emblems and insignia are in the Boy Scout Handbook. The scout uniform is always to be worn with pride, and is to appear neat and clean. The shirt must always be buttoned and fully tucked into pants or shorts.


All scouts and adult leaders are expected to wear their class A uniform to ALL meetings, outings and activities, unless otherwise specified by the Scoutmaster. When traveling in public the class A uniform is required unless otherwise notified. Scouts who arrive for a trip and are not in class A uniform will be sent home for the uniform before the troop departs.  Often during the summer, Class B uniforms are used for Monday meetings, but the Troop always travels in Class A Uniform.


The Class B uniform consists of a scouting-appropriate T-shirt, usually one for Troop 268 (currently $5 each), and whatever shorts or slacks may be suitable for the weather. Class B uniform is more for working on specific projects, where the clothing may get dirty, wet, etc., while Class A uniform is for more official occasions, meetings, appearing in public, etc.


Approximately once a year in late spring/early summer the troop holds an equipment and uniform exchange day. This allows older scouts to sell or donate uniforms/equipment (backpacks, sleeping bags) they have outgrown, providing an opportunity for younger scouts to obtain needed items at a good price.



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Finances

Troop 268 is financed by the members of the troop (boys and parents) through various fund raisers sponsored by the troop during the year, and through membership fees and dues. No funding is provided to the troop by local or national scouting organizations. Membership fees are $7.00 per year for scouts and registered adult leaders, and are due in January of each year. After the first year of membership, Troop 268 pays the annual re-registration fee for active scouts.


Dues

Dues of $1.00 per month are collected by the scout treasurer, and are owed even if a boy misses troop meetings. The scout's dues cover the cost of his advancement awards and program supplies. Field trips and extra events may be an additional cost.


Scout Accounts

Troop 268's treasury includes a separate account for each scout. Earnings the scout makes with the troop will go into his own account to help cover his scouting costs (summer camp, personal scouting supplies, etc.). This places some of the responsibility on the scout and gives him a sense of pride from earning his own way. The Scout Account Policy is explained in full detail near the end of this guide.


Major Fund Raiser

Each fall Troop 268 conducts its major annual fund raiser. The Holiday Citrus Fruit Sale involves selling citrus fruit baskets and boxes. Orders are taken in October and November, and fruit is delivered in early December so fruit can be used as Christmas gifts. Scouts are encouraged to sell to friends, neighbors and relatives. Parents are welcome to assist their son(s). Fruit is purchased from a wholesaler in Columbus at prices competitive with local grocery stores. Profits from the sale are split between the troop and the scout's individual accounts. The more fruit a scout sells, the more he earns for his account. Scouts who actively participate in the fruit sale can earn enough to pay for most, if not all of their summer camp fees. The fruit sale is also an opportunity to earn the Salesmanship merit badge.


Other Fund Raisers

Other fund raisers are held during the year. In recent years the Troop has jointly sold flowers with the Optimists' Club.  This has become a great fundraiser. The Troop also sells BSA popcorn. Previous fund raisers have included a car wash, pizza sale, and a refreshment booth at Worthington Market Days.


The Troop Committee determines whether funds raised through these events are retained by the troop, or distributed based on scout participation to scout accounts. The committee also considers and evaluates additional fund raising opportunities throughout the year, and makes the final determination of what fund raisers to undertake.

 

 

Advancement

Advancement through the ranks of scouting provides a means of recognizing the scouts' accomplishments of scout skills, leadership and service. Older scouts serve as role models for scouts at lower ranks.


When a boy joins Boy Scouts his first achievement is the rank of Scout. From here, the scout learns numerous scouting and leadership skills, and progressively moves up the ranks to Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and the highest rank in Boy Scouting, Eagle.


In working toward a rank advancement, the scout will complete the requirements listed in the Boy Scout Handbook, for the rank he is pursuing. Work on these requirements can be done at home, at scout meetings and, frequently, on campouts. Summer camp is also an excellent opportunity to complete many of the needed requirements. As these requirements are completed the scout gets them signed off by a registered adult leader or by a scout at least two ranks above the rank being signed off. The person signing off the requirements should have first-hand knowledge that the requirement was completed. With the exception of the physical fitness requirement for Tenderfoot, parents are not permitted to sign off the requirements. This is to encourage the scout to interact with the adult leaders, and with other scouts of higher rank.


After all the requirements for a rank advancement are completed the scout arranges with the Scoutmaster for a Scoutmaster's conference. This is a meeting with the scout in which all of the rank requirements are reviewed in detail. The Scoutmaster will typically ask the scout to demonstrate specific knowledge or skills learned in the requirement. Skills and knowledge from lower ranks may also be reviewed by the Scoutmaster. When the Scoutmaster is satisfied that the scout has completed the requirements of the rank he signs the scout's book as a record of the conference.


After the Scoutmaster's conference is successfully completed, the scout should request a board of review, asking the Troop's Advancement Co-ordinator to arrange this at a suitable time and place. The board consists of three adults from the troop other than the Scoutmaster or the scout's parents. The board simply asks the scout open-ended questions concerning his scouting experience, satisfaction with and improvement suggestions for the troop, and his goals for achieving future ranks. In spite of the intimidating title, the board of review is intended to be an open two-way dialogue in which the scout can feel comfortable sharing his thoughts and concerns. At the conclusion of the review, the board initials and dates the scout's book. Typically the scout then receives immediate recognition among the troop of his rank advancement.


The advancement process is culminated at the next Court of Honor, where the scout is formally recognized for his accomplishments. At this meeting, held 3 to 4 times per year, scouts receive recently earned rank advancements and merit badges, along with other special recognition. The Court of Honor is a special event, and all family members are encouraged to attend and be a part of their scout's success.



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Campouts

Camping has been an integral part of the scouting program since its beginning. Troop 268 typically holds one outdoor camping trip every month except December. The trip is usually within 2 hours of Columbus, and goes from Friday evening through mid-day Sunday. Unless otherwise planned, the troop meets at Worthington Presbyterian Church for departure. Upon return from the trip scouts are transported to their homes.


Permission forms are sent home with the scouts two to three meetings prior to each campout. These forms MUST be completed, signed and returned by the regular troop meeting prior to departure. A current health/emergency treatment authorization form for each scout must be on file with the troop before he can attend any campout or outing.


Having sufficient transportation can make or break an outing. Parents/Adults who can provide transportation are welcome, and are encouraged to join the troop on campouts. Drivers are asked on the permission form to provide information concerning their vehicle and insurance, although this may also be recorded with the troop to save filling out the forms each time.


Campouts typically cost $10.00 per person per outing. This covers 3 meals on Saturday and breakfast on Sunday. This money is collected at the meeting prior to the campout, and provided to the scout assigned to purchase the food. Most often this is done on a per patrol basis. To allow the scouts buying the food sufficient time to do so, those expecting to attend a campout MUST pay for their food by the meeting before the campout. Scout account funds may not be used for campout fees. If a check is sent with the boy to pay for food, please leave the payee line blank so whoever is chosen to buy the food can cash the check. Additional fees may be collected if the camping location charges a fee, or if additional activities are planned.


A typical camping trip departs from Worthington Presbyterian Church on Friday evening. Adult leaders and additional adults as needed drive to the camping location, usually less than 2 hours away. Camp is set up, and if time permits, a late snack or cracker barrel is made available. Lights out/quiet time begins at 11:00 PM.  The caving campout to Kentucky requires 4-5 hours travel time.


Scouts awake at about 7:00 AM, and begin the day with breakfast. Following breakfast and cleanup, the day's activities begin. Lunch is usually something quick and easy. Dinner preparation begins in time to complete the evening meal and cleanup by 6:30 or 7:00 PM. An evening campfire may be held at the Scoutmaster's discretion if time and weather permit.


The troop supplies some tents, cooking equipment and utensils. Troop tents can accommodate two boys. If a boy has his own tent and can put it up and take it down himself, he is welcome to bring it. Generally tents that sleep more than two boys are discouraged.


The BSA policy of 2 deep leadership requires that 2 adult leaders be present at all times. On campouts at least 4 adults, 2 of which are registered leaders, are needed. This allows 2 adults to stay with the troop in the event that a scout may need to be transported. If a minimum of 2 adult leaders are not available the campout may be canceled.


Each scout must provide their own bedding (sleeping bag, pillow, blankets) and all personal gear fit for the season.


A complete list can be found in the Boy Scout Handbook, on pages 50 - 53. A packing list may also be found here.

  • Sleeping Bag
  • Flashlight (2 or more)
  • Pillow, if needed
  • Extra clothes
  • Mess kit
  • Personal care items
  • Eating utensils
  • Clothing
  • Footwear
  • Raingear
  • Additional Cold Weather Items



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Summer Camp

Troop 268 regularly participates in a summer camp program at a BSA camp location. This is typically sometime in July. All scouts are encouraged to attend since summer camp is an excellent opportunity to accomplish many advancement requirements. Scouts attending summer camp can expect to advance at least one rank over the course of the week-long program. There is also plenty of time for swimming, socializing and many other fun activities.


New scouts who join the troop in late winter or spring are encouraged to attend summer camp. They should however attend at least two weekend campouts with the troop prior to summer camp. This allows the Scoutmaster, other adult leaders, and other troop members to get to know the new scouts before spending a week together in a week-long program some distance from home. And the new scouts have a chance to become comfortable with those in the troop.


ALL scouts and adults under 40 years of age staying overnight at summer camp are required to have a complete BSA medical form, including a record of a complete physical exam within the past three years. Adults 40 years of age or older must have a medical form with a record of a complete physical exam within the past 12 months.


The fee for summer camp is typically $230.00 or less, and can be further reduced by early registration. This fee covers all food and most of the activities. Each scout should bring a small amount of cash for special programs, souvenirs, and miscellaneous expenses. Detailed information is provided as summer camp approaches.


To make summer camp successful, at least three adult leaders should be present at all times. Four are preferred. Typically the Scoutmaster and one or more of Assistant Scoutmasters will be in camp during the full week. Parents are urged to come during the week, and additional parents are needed later in the week to assist with boards of review for scouts.


Venture Crew

As an additional incentive to older scouts to stay involved, Troop 268 offers a venture program. This program is limited to boys who are 13 years of age and have achieved the rank of First Class. The focus is to provide more challenging scouting experiences such as high adventure trips to Tinnerman canoe base in Canada, Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, Florida Sea Base, National Jamborees, National Tier Charles Sommers Canoe Base and more. Usually these trips occur during the summer, after summer camp. The program will allow the older scouts to jointly work together as a Crew during the adventure.  Sometimes it is possible to earn a merit badge consistent with the primary emphasis of the high adventure base.  However, the BSA National bases do not offer merit badges, as the primary purpose is the adventure experience. Exciting opportunities like backpacking, bicycle treks, snorkeling & scuba diving, horsemanship, sea kayaking, canoeing, rappelling, sailing, rifle and shotgun shooting are all unique activities associated with venture crew scouts.


Medical & Health Conditions

In order for your son to have the most positive scouting experience the Scoutmaster and adult leaders must be advised of any and all medical conditions your son may have. This includes allergies or other sensitivities, conditions such as ADD/ADHD or conditions which could limit a scout's level of physical activity. This information is held in strictest confidence. Please make sure these conditions are discussed with our adult leaders. We need to be aware of any possible medical emergency we may encounter so we can be as prepared as possible to handle it. We will be happy to carry any special "medical gear" if provided by the parent.


The Troop maintains up-to-date first aid kits for each patrol, as well as for the Troop as a whole, and many of the scouts and adult leaders have first aid training.


Medications

If proper medication is not brought to an outing, the parent/guardian may need to bring it to the outing, or an adult leader may need to bring the scout home from the outing. One of the adult leaders will take charge of all medications and dispense them at the times specified by the scout's parents.

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Adult Leadership

There is a strong correlation between parent involvement and a boy's success and enjoyment of the scouting program. There are many ways in which parents can participate in the Troop 268 program. As a parent of a scout, you may be called upon occasionally to provide support to the troop. Drivers are usually needed for camping trips. Parents are encouraged to join the boys and adult leaders on campouts.


All parents providing assistance to the troop are expected to complete a session on BSA Youth Protection Training. This training conveys the BSA's commitment to protecting scouts, and it covers the BSA policy of two-deep leadership. Additional adult leader training at several levels is available and is encouraged.


Numerous adult leadership opportunities exist in the troop. These can be fulfilled by parents, guardians, or other adults interested in contributing to the scouting program. As the leadership needs of the troop are identified adult leadership positions may be created, revised or consolidated to best meet the needs of the troop.


Troop Committee

All parents are invited to participate in the troop to oversee troop operation, financial reporting and fund raising efforts. A strong troop committee allows the Scoutmaster and assistants to focus their time and energy on providing a solid, rewarding program for the boys. The committee meets about once a month, usually the third Monday at the same time as the troop meeting. Meetings usually take no more than one hour. All parents are invited and encouraged to attend.


Conduct & Discipline

Troop 268's expectation is that all scouts and adults conduct themselves in accordance with the Scout Law. If all scouts work toward this goal the need for discipline will be minimal.


Boys are boys, and once in a while they become unruly. Depending on the circumstances a certain amount of unruliness is tolerated. We prefer for the boy leaders to exercise their leadership skills and work to regain control of these situations whenever possible. However in situations concerning safety, or where boy leaders do not succeed in dealing with the situation adult leaders will promptly intervene. Extreme situations will be discussed with parents, and in some cases parents may be asked to attend troop meetings and activities with their son.


Friendly joking and kidding is part of being a boy, and part of developing strong friendships. Taken to an extreme however, it can result in hard feelings and flared tempers. Humiliation/hazing of any kind is in conflict with the scout law and is absolutely not tolerated.


Rules

In addition to the Scout Law, Oath and Motto, the following "Rules" are in place to prevent problems and provide for safe enjoyable activities. Any prohibited items listed below will be confiscated by an adult leader.


  • Electronic games, radios, or boom boxes are not allowed on outings.
  • Per BSA policy, any liquid fuel camping equipment (stoves, heaters, lighters etc.) may be used only under the direct supervision of an adult. All liquid fuel must be kept in a proper container and must be under the supervision of an adult. (The troop provides propane stoves and fuel for cooking on campouts. Liquid fuels and appliances are discouraged.)
  • Aerosol or pump spray containers of insect repellent, or any other flammable substance are prohibited.
  • Fixed blade knives are prohibited.
  • Double bladed hatchets/axes are prohibited.



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Scout Account Policy

Individual accounts are maintained by Troop 268 to help scouts save for scout related expenses. The following are policies and procedures for these accounts.

1. Scout accounts are opened for each scout when they join the troop. The initial balance in each account is zero.

2. The amount of funds deposited into scout accounts is based the scout's participation in troop fund raising efforts. The troop committee determines specific guidelines for allocation of proceeds from each fund raising activity.

3. No interest is paid on scout accounts.

4. To have funds applied to summer camp or a high adventure trip, the scout must obtain written parental consent.

5. If a scout desires to purchase scouting equipment with his scout account funds, he should submit a written request describing the purchase to the Scoutmaster. This request should be signed by the scout and by his parents. The Scoutmaster may approve the purchase himself or send the request to the troop committee for approval. If the request is approved, the scout should purchase the equipment and submit a receipt to the Scoutmaster. A check will then be issued by the treasurer to the scout for the amount of the purchase.

ACCEPTABLE USES OF SCOUT ACCOUNT FUNDS: IMPROPER USES OF SCOUT ACCOUNT FUNDS
Personal camping gear (sleeping bag, tent, pack, etc.) Monthly dues
Summer camp fees Monthly campout costs
High Adventure camp fees. Troop gear (tents, dining flies, cooking equipment, etc.) unless these items are being replaced through the scout's negligence or misconduct.
College expenses, books, (for scouts over 18 years) Nintendo and similar hand-held portable electronic games.
Scout uniform items  
Merit badge booklets and other scouting books  
Scout related training (JLOW, Nagatamen)  

6. If a boy chooses not to continue in scouting, and has not attended meetings or campouts for 12 months, the funds remaining in his scout account revert back to the troop general fund.

7. When an active scout reaches the age of 18, he may withdraw any remaining funds from his individual account providing such funds will be used for his further education. If the scout does not use the money for higher education by his 19th birthday, the balance in his account will then revert back to the troop.

8. If a scout transfers to another troop which provides individual scout accounts, then his funds are transferred to his scout account in the new troop. If a scout transfers to a troop which does not provide individual scout accounts, then the scout's funds shall be made available on the same terms as if he were still in Troop 268. Special circumstances involving relocation shall be considered by the Scoutmaster and Troop Committee.