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The 'contest-group Woerden' would join the event in multi/two section.

This means two radio's active with 5 operators (two could not be there due to different circumstances).

Preparation started the day before on Friday.

We erected the 16 meter tower which held the 80 meter dipole and the inverted 'L' for 160 meter.

The 40 meter vertical got mounted some 60 meters away from the tower for flawless operation on 40/80 meter or 40/160 meter.

This worked very efficient together with the coax stub filters.

(Details about how these are constructed can be found here: www.k1ttt.net/technote/k2trstub.html)

On Friday we simple did not have the time to install all the antenna's, so we decided to start on the low bands at night and build the 15 and 20 meter antenna on Saturday morning.

 

 Tower.

 

Late in the evening we all gathered at the contest location to install equipment, mark coax, configure laptops and such.

Tune the amplifiers,...wait...did the house manager switch the fuses for two amplifier operation?

We had asked the guy but did not check if this was would hold.

Nope, still 6 ampere fuse, not even close to what we needed!

We would have to find a way to solve this next morning (we did not dare to wake him at 01:00 local).

So, we started the contest with both transceiver running 100 watts into the antenna's.

Not all that much but at least we could start the contest.

Difficult to get through with this amount of power but when it was not to busy we could easily work into South- America and the Caribean on 40 meter.

Some were really strong like PZ5A who was a real 59 for a very long time.

Surprisingly we could not get through, possible because of the strong North-American pile up's.

 

 Two verticals.

 

After a short sleep, Fred and Joop arrived at dawn and we started to build the 20 and 15 meter vertical.

After this, some final tuning to the 160 meter antenna and we were ready to go again.

Mainly 'Search and Pound' but after the manager helped us out with a bigger 16 ampere fuse we were at full power and 'running' as well.

We all enjoyed the play with the radio's and the less experienced could get used to operating a HF contest.

A couple visitors came along and even brought some fine cake.(thanks Peter and Herma)

 

 Position 1.

 

 Position 2.

 

On Sunday Fred and myself had family obligations so we had to leave around 11:00 local.

Willem, Stan and Joop would go on till about 15:00 and take some antenna's down before heading home.

We all had to work the other day so we decided not to stay till the end of the contest.

I don't know the QSO total yet but it will not be a number one score for sure.

Never mind, we enjoyed the fun and that's what it's all about in our contest group.

Thanks to all the operators and visitors for their support!

Special thanks to Wander/PD1DER, for the pictures!

 

 Joop

 

 Stan/PD0LUR