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1) How did you get involved in Hamradio and how many years are being a ham now?
I became interested as a 8 year-old schoolboy (1954) building and making things from seeing articles in

Practical Wireless magazine. 
Now 61 years old, have been a Radio Amateur for 39 years (40 in February 2008)

2) What atracted you the most in being a hamradio operator?
I just loved the hobby! Loved SWL-ing, especially to Eddie Staartz on Radio Hilversum from the Netherlands.

Heard Amateurs on 40 metres, got hooked!

3) What is your favorite mode and/or band?
Operating c.w., especially 7, 10 and 18MHz operating /p on HF and VHF.

 

4) What equipment do you use?
Alinco DX-70TH, Icom IC-756PRoIII and home made antennas.

5) Do you hold DXCC and what is the score?

None held!


 6) What has been your most memorable story related to hamradio so far?
Travelling 300 miles to a club in north-east of England to provide a 'club talk' about PW-magazine.

An old Amateur (now a Silent Key) said (no hint of a smile on his face) "I've just cycled 12 miles to hear you

speak young man, I hope it's worth it"!

Taken aback I replied,  "I've just driven 300 miles to provide the talk and I hope it's worth the 12 mile cycle ride"!
Afterwards (the talk seemed to be enjoyed by the club) he approached  me while I was talking to other club members.

I asked him if the talk was 'worth 12 miles'.

Thinking deeply, and without a  hint of a smile he replied...."Well, maybe it was worth 8 miles"!(the club has since closed!). You can imagine how cheered I was with this man's attitude!

7) Do you think CW had it's best time since you don't need it anymore to get a license?
No, I think c.w. is getting more popular now that operators can choose to use it, whether or not they didn't reach

the required standards in their own country.

They are realising just how useful a mode it is.

I can always get a QSO on the c.w. mode!

8) How would you explain our hobby to someone not familiar with hamradio?
I tell them that Amateur Radio is a way of life that enables me to share my interest in the world, its people,

languages and the friendship we can share.

Amateur Radio is an amazing tool to help build friendships, learn technology and discover the world.

Being the Editor of Practical Wireless magazine (18 years) has enabled me to meet and make many, many

friends all over the world.

However, I  would like to see more Muslim countries encouraging our hobby.

At the moment such countries see our hobby as a threat to their (very often) closed and extremely restricted

cultures, whereas in fact contact with other - less restrictive cultures - can provide many benefits for the Muslim

and ordinary human being.

I look forward to our wonderful hobby being available anywhere in the world without restrictions or questions

from Governments (of any kind!!).

9) Do you have other hobbys besides Hamradio?
Along with Amateur Radio I am a committed Christian (and Church Warden in the Anglican Church),

love languages, travel, railways and railway history, ships, aircraft and the history of medicine.

(I have worked as a medical and science writer for 40 years)

10) Any final words to the people reading the interviews?
Join your local Amateur Radio club...I owe much of the early help I received from my club in Southampton,

Hampshire, England for what they did to encourage me.